Magnificent Monteverdi at St. Andrew’s

We had a brief sound check before the concert.

We had a brief sound check before the concert.

Soloists check for a sound balance at St. Andrew's.The Monteverdi Choir (we’ve already renamed the group!) and The Whole Noyse brass group was asked to come to St. Andrew’s Cathedral on Sunday at 2:45 pm for a sound check, since we had never rehearsed in the space before for this piece.  Naturally in a different church with different architecture and acoustics, the setup needed to change from St. Theresa’s of Friday night.

The line for tickets stretched out the door.

The line for tickets stretched out the door.

But already, people were starting to arrive and line up at the ticket table. At one point the line for tickets stretched all the way out the door through the parking lot, up to Parke Chapel! Carl began to get a little anxious, because we needed to start the concert on time.

Just a little after 4 pm, the choir gathered in the back of St. Andrew’s Cathedral which was by now, absolutely packed, with every seat taken. Father Darrow Aiona gave a brief welcome and introduction, as Father William Kunisch had last Friday at St. Theresa’s giving three important pieces of important information:

. . . all the way up to Parke Chapel!

. . . all the way up to Parke Chapel!

#1 Where the restrooms were located, #2 Please turn off all cell phones and #3 Please hold your applause until after #10 Lauda Jerusalem.

Then the choir began the chant from the back of the cathedral and processed slowly to the front of the nave. With the glorious tenor intonation, the choir and orchestra resounded with the brilliant opening movement, “Deus in adiuturorium meum.”

The procession begins in the packed cathedral.

The procession begins in the packed cathedral.

Then followed the rest of the movements, just like clockwork, and I would call the audience spellbound by the enchanting music. By the end of #10, the audience could not contain themselves any longer and gave the performers a standing ovation after the first half!

The absolutely sublime “Sancta Maria” followed intermission, with all the sopranos sounding as one voice. I think it was my favorite movement of the entire work, and of course, the glorious “Amen” finished up the last movement. Again, there was a long, sustained standing ovation at the end of the concert, well-deserved by all the performers. Carl took his bows, but then held up the score, giving the credit to Monteverdi for writing this glorious music.

In comparing the two performances in the two venues, I would call the St. Theresa’s concert more spiritual, and the St. Andrew’s concert more celebratory. Both were excellently performed and I know everyone went home happy! What a gift to this community! Unforgettable for both performers and audience alike.

A view of Carl Crosier, conductor, from the front.

A view of Carl Crosier, conductor, from the vantage point of the choristers.

No problem with the theorbo today.

No problem with the theorbo today.

About Katherine Crosier

In addition to playing the organ I am interested in documenting life's special moments through journaling, scrapbooking, photography and slideshow production. My family just groans.
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