Renewable and sustainable

Right outside my bathroom door.

Right outside my bathroom door.

Something that I have found utterly admirable is Iceland’s commitment to energy that is renewable and sustainable. This is the first hotel I have been in that has recyclable bins as part of each room’s decor.

From Wikipedia: Renewable energy provides almost 100 percent of electricity production, with about 75 percent coming from Iceland – Built as it is on a volcano, Iceland has tapped the earth’s natural warmth to supply 85% of the country’s housing with heat. Between geothermal and hydropower, the electricity supply is 100% renewable energy. Iceland has so much geothermal capacity that their ambassador to Britain is in discussions about whether or not they could build an interconnector into the UK grid. hydropower and 25 percent from geothermal power. Most of the hydropower plants are owned by Landsvirkjun (the National Power Company) which is the main supplier of electricity in Iceland.

Geothermal well (shown by the steam)

Geothermal well (shown by the steam)

Did you know that there is a 25-mile pipeline that carries not oil, but hot water for the city of Reykjavik? Here’s another fact I found: Iceland – Built as it is on a volcano, Iceland has tapped the earth’s natural warmth to supply 85% of the country’s housing with heat. Between geothermal and hydropower, the electricity supply is 100% renewable energy. Iceland has so much geothermal capacity that their ambassador to Britain is in discussions about whether or not they could build an interconnector into the UK grid. 

Here’s some video I took of a geyser erupting:

imageToday we toured the South Coast, and most of the day was cold and rainy. We saw two more waterfalls, and I am so glad I had a waterproof coat on (thanks to Carol Rodi, Carl’s sister!) We visited a folk museum where I found a few keyboard instruments on display.

At the glacier

At the glacier

We also stopped at a black sand beach where we got an opportunity to get off the bus and walk in the rain, but for me the highlight of the day was seeing a glacier. What was astounding, though, was to learn that the glacier has retreated one-half mile in just a year’s time, more evidence of climate change.

Further, the large lagoon, a half mile long, apparently has only appeared in the last year. Before that, there was only a small pond.

 

The large lagoon at the base of the glacier.

The large lagoon at the base of the glacier.

If you are wondering why the glacier looks grayish instead of white, it is because it was covered with ash from the volcano which erupted in 2010 and caused so much havoc for the airlines. You remember, the one with the unpronounceable name—Eyjafjallajökull. Our guide, Gunnar, has said it for us at least a dozen times, and I still don’t get it! We got a pretty good view of it on our way back to Reykjavik, and Gunnar said it was 80% visible.

The volcano Eyjafjallajökull

The volcano Eyjafjallajökull

About Katherine Crosier

In addition to playing the organ I am interested in documenting life's special moments through journaling, scrapbooking, photography and slideshow production. My family just groans.
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One Response to Renewable and sustainable

  1. john f bicknell says:

    i enjoyed the lesson today! jb

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